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PLANTINGS 1868.
[LOCAL NEWS]
 

A DUBBO VINEYARD - The first vineyard that has been tried so near the region of our hot interior plains - or, at least, the first on so large a scale - has been commenced nine miles from Dubbo, by Mr. J. E. Serisier. The Dubbo Dispatch of the 2nd instant published a full descriptive report of the enterprise. We may point out another feature of singularity in it - it is, we think, the most costly undertaking yet ventured on free-selected land, as we understand the Dispatch to state. About nine miles from Dubbo, on the road to Wellington, occurs sorne pretty valley scenery, between hills of moderate height. One of these small valleys has been selected by Mr. Serisier, who has already planted a vineyard of forty acres, and purposes cultivating as a farmer one hundred acres more, and ultimately erecting for himself a family residence, besides all necessary vineyard and winemaking buildings. Up to the present time 1500 has been expended on the land, and before the vineyard begins to make returns, in the form of marketable wine, about 6000, it is supposed, will have been laid out. About a year since the land was conditionally purchased, and Mr. Serisier having obtained (principally from Mr. John Wyndham, of Dalwood) about 70,000 vine cuttings, of the most approved wine grapes, and also the services of an experienced German vigneron from the Dalwood vineyard, who has taken the management of the Dubbo vineyard - forty acres of porous and friable soil, on a gently sloping ridge, were enclosed with a paling fence, and about forty men (part Europeans, part Chinese) were set to work to plough and trench the ground and to plant the vine cuttings. All round, inside the fence, were also planted trees, partly fruit trees, and partly English park trees, and hedges are also being reared, in order to shelter the vineyard from the scorching hot winds that the plains are at times visited with. Several buildings have also been erected in progress towards the complete wine-making establishment ultimately contemplated. The vine cuttings were in the first week of the present month just budding, and looked very healthy. A small creek running through the valley has been dammed and affords a fine water reservoir, while a well yields, at 45 feet, fresh pure water. The whole has at present the most promising appearance. It is sincerely to be hoped that the enterprise will eventually pay Mr. Serisier a good profit annually, for so large and patient an outlay. It is well that there are men with courage to enter deliberately on so extensive an undertaking ; but we hope that Mr Serisier's example will be followed on a smaller scale by other farmers and free selectors, with the view of either making their own wine, or of selling their grapes (or wine partly made) to other and larger makers - as is the custom in parts of France.

DUBBO 1869.
[FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT]

STOCK. - A squatter, who has just arrived in Dubbo, gives an excellent account of the country about Coonamble and the Wammerawa. The weather has been propitious and food is very abundant; but there are really no fat stock (worth calling fat stock) for either the Maitland, Sydney, or Melbourne markets, at present. There are hundreds of bullocks and sheep, in good condition, but there has not yet been sufficient time to enable them to get into a first rate marketable condition. About 1100 head of store cattle (McKay Brothers) crossed the Macquarie yesterday, en route for Melbourne; 250 fat cattle, and about 1200 fat sheep from Toloom (McMahon's), enroute for the Sydney market. Also, a lot of fat weathers from Haddon Riggs have started, or about to start for Sydney. Mr. McMulloch has become the owner of Mr. Michael McMahon's station, opposite Coonamble. This station contained about 8000 sheep, and I hear the price was somewhere about 7s. 3d. per head. Squatters on the lower part of the Merri Merri district, and the Lower Castlereagh, and the stations between the Macquarie and Castlereagh are busy with the lambing, from all I can learn the lambing this season will be bad, probably a loss of 50 per cent, over previous seasons. So that we have not yet done with the disastrous effects of the late drought. Another thing, there is a deficiency of stock, if we take the stations in this direction as a whole. This is particularly noticed by those who have just returned from a tour through the back country.

BOURKE. - I have not received my letters from Bourke in time for this day's mail to Sydney, but I am informed from another source that hundreds of bales of wool that were awaiting transit on the Upper Darling have nearly all been removed by the Darling River steamers for Melbourne. Five huge dray loads of wool (Josephson's Jandra station) from Bourke, passed Dubbo today, en route for Maitland. The man in charge told me the roads hence to Bourke were soft and heavy, but that food was plentiful and that he met several teams laden with general stores for Bourke, Wilcannia, and a few large stations.

THE VINE - Mr. J. E. Serisier is making another attempt in his vineyard at Eumalga Plain, about seven miles south of Dubbo, to cultivate the vine. Last year he must have lost nearly 1000 on this speculation, owing to the drought and the failure of the cuttings which had been planted. Ten men are now employed in planting 70,000 cuttings, and from the mildness of the season so far there is a very prospect of his perseverance being rewarded with success.

BUSINESS - This is very slack in Dubbo just now. A good criterion is the public houses, which are mostly free from customers. In fact the Bonifaces themselves are astonished, and it is not an uncommon thing for one of them to visit another public house to see if he alone is the only one short of drinkers. When times are dull, it is amusing to observe how one man will watch another, and as a substitute for something to do, talk over the private affairs of other people, about which he can know nothing.

OUR GOLD FIELD - The prospecting parties working in the bed of the Macquarie, near Dubbo, of late, have been oompelled to abandon that locality in consequence of the repeated rise in the river. Some have commenced sinking near the gravel pits - the old spot - two miles south east of Dubbo, and are earning a livelihood. I should hot like to encourage an influx of diggers at present; but it occurred to me yesterday, when at the diggings, that a few more prospecting parties would add considerably to the probability of coming sooner on good payable gold. There is a party prospecting on the left bank of the Macquarie; nice shotty gold has been found, and there is a strong belief that a gold field will yet be discovered within a few miles of Dubbo before long; but I should not like to say anything definite at present

The Hon. Charles Cowper passed through Dubbo a few days ago, en route to visit his stations in the north west.

Weather fine.
Dubbo, 18th July.

DUBBO 1869.
[FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT]

STOCK - 220 fat cattle, purchased by Mr. T. Fitzpatrick, from Mr. A. Cruickshank, passed Warren on Wednesday, en route for Wagga Wagga for sale; Powers Rutherford and Co, agents. 222 good store cattle, between three and six years, mixed ewes, belonging to Mr. Hugh Munro, of Collie, crossed at Timberibungie, yesterday, bound for Wagga Wagga; Powers Rutherford, and Co, agents, 300 head of fat cattle, Mr. John Lynch's, passed through yesterday, en route for Western market. Mr. W. Reakes (Narrawama, Marthaguy Creek) has started 250 store cattle for Melbourne. 22 head of fat, bullocks and cows (W. Beaumont's), have left the Castlereagh for Dubbo market 800 head of store cattle, owner unknown to me were at Terramongamine last night, en route to Melbourne. Mr. R. G. Goodisson, Dubbo agent to Powers, Rutherford, and Co. sold Cogala station, on the Castlereagh River, yesterday, for Mr. Dugald McVicar, to Mr. Walter Ennes, at a satisfactory price. I think I wrote previously, that 270 fat cattle (Woods and Wyld's), 200 of which are prime bullocks, passed Dubbo on Wednesday, en route for Western markets, and that 120 (Horan's), from the Merri Merri; passed on Tuesday for Orange. 200 (Ridge's) from the Mole were between Cannonbar and Warren, on Wednesday, and about 150 (C. Read's) from the Warren station, are coming up, for Sydney or Western markets. A mob of McMahon's, near Coonamble, will soon be on the road to market. It is also reported that a mob of Kite's cattle, and 300 fat cattle, from Bullarora, besides two flocks of sheep, are coming up the Macquarie, for Sydney. Mustering is going on at several stations. Some of these items differ from the local journal's report, but they are reliable notwithstanding.

QUARTZ REEFS - I have not heard anything startling from the Gladstone reef this week. Several parties are on the look out for new reefs in this quarter, and two or three have been found, but nothing can be done with them in absence of capital and machinery.

DUBBO DIGGINGS - M Gregor's party this week have come upon better wash stuff than their average; but Miller's party, working in a claim adjacent, have not yet been so lucky.

LOOK-OUT - There is an accomplished gent in this locality raising the wind by collecting subscriptions for the Dubbo hospital; he has no authority to collect moneys for this institution. He spends all he gets in drink.

THE VINE - Mr. J. E. Serisier has finished planting upwards of 70,000 vines, at Eumalga Plain vigneron. The planting was commenced on the 24th June, the cuttings being brought to Dubbo by mail to keep the men going. On the 3rd July 4,000 were planted, each man planting in fine weather between 200 and 250 per day. By the 17th July, 27,000 were planted, and by the 19th 21,000. On as average twenty five men have been employed. Nearly 50,000 have been planted in the vineyard, and 80,000 in the nursery. The varieties consist of Madieras, Shepherd Reislings, Doree, Black Burgundy, Reisling, Shiraz (white), Muscats (three), Verdots, Hermitage, and Lambuscat. The planting was finished on the 8th August; those planted at the beginning promise well. The cuttings were brought up in three-bushel bags, not in cases and sand as last year when they all perished. In bags, too, the carriage is cheaper. Last year's planting was done with a spade and pick, in subsoil ground; this year's has been accomplished with French dibbles, which permit the cuttings to go from 18 to 20 inches deep without difficulty, the soil having been well worked previously. The subsoil is over two feet deep; sand was used with every plant, the planting being in quinques. Mr. Serisier supervised the planting himself. The plants were chosen from the various vignerons in the Hunter district. If this vineyard succeeds a very profitable industry will soon be established in this quarter. The weather so far is propitious, and it is to be hoped will continue, so that enterprise may meet with its due reward.

BOGAN ELECTORATE - There is talk about bringing out a local man of genius' here to oppose Mr Lord at the next general election, If I am right in my conjecture as to the individual, Mr. Lord will be lost in the fog as soon as he gets on the hustings, Dr. Badham may know a thing or two, but our coming man can teach him to write, speak, translate eleven languages, blow, puff, bounce- anything, in short, comprised in the curriculum of an ordinary university, which the doctor may not know. From the simple mathematical problem of how many beans in a bottle make five, to the doctrine of centripetal and oentrifugal forces, the new candidate “is all there”, and a full report of his maiden speech shall grace the columns of your paper - if ever he should speak, for he's not a bad fellow at the bottom.

DISTORTED TELEGRAMS - The local journal here has a paragraph headed as above, and as one portion of it refers to tho telegram which I sent you in reference to the sticking-up of Wambiana station by the armed men on the 27th ultimo, I will notice lt.  "A few weeks since," says this ungrammatical paragraphist. "Mr. Todhunter's station' was robbed; yet not one of the telegrams that have teen oommunicated to the various journals are (sic) correct." The italics are mine. “One account sensationally represents the robbers “firing at and brutally ill-using a female servant"' These words were in my telegram. I am not responsible for any other; but my own I'll stand by. "Need we say," continues this writer, "that with the exception of the statement that Warnbiana homestead was stuck up, there is net an atom of truth in the whole of them." Now turn to the same local journal of the 6th August, and you will find a paragraph headed “Bushranging on the Macquarie," in which my account sent to you a week previously is almost copied verbatim. 'It is as follows: -- " There was only one person at the house at the time - a half caste woman, and the robber immediately presented his pistol at her. . .  The fellow immediately commenced a search. While thus engaged, the woman courageously sprang upon the robber, pulled the false whiskers he wore from his face, and tried to overpower him." Now listen to this bit of sensational writing in which the editor talks of this half-caste lady tightly grasping a bushranger six feet high in his stockings, and stoutly belabouring him, "She had him so tightly grasped," says the writer, "and belaboured him so stoutly that he could not use - if he intended to do so - his revolver.  For some time the tussel between him and the woman continued, and during it she bit a piece out of the baok of his hand. At length he called for assistance and his companions rushed in and freed him from his tenacious and brave adversary. . .  They tore a pair of boots from her, and wrenched a ring she wore off her finger.,. They went to the store where the spirits were kept, and filled their flasks. Not satisfied with this, they wantonly destroyed the remainder.  After this, I ask, how can this bellicose edltor state - "Need we say that with the exception of the statement that “Wambiana was stuck up, there is not an atom ot truth in the whole of them," "Them" means the rigamarole telegrams stuok up by this circumscribed writer as a phantom to knock into "smithereens.” I leave the public, however, to judge whether the woman, be she poor or rich, whlte or black, was not brutally used in her endeavour to protect her master's property.

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