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INCENDIARY FIRE AT DUBBO.
[THE BRISBANE COURIER : FEBRUARY 26, 1870]
 

INCENDIARY FIRE AT DUBBO. - The Dispatch reports that on Friday morning, the 9th instant, the townspeople were startled by a report that a destructive fire had taken place at Mr. J. E. Serisier's farm and vineyard, Eumalga Plain. At first we were disinclined to believe the rumor, but upon making inquiry at the proper quarters, we soon learned that it was only too true ; and that a stack of hay holding some twenty tons, and another stack, containing about four hundred bushels of wheat, were destroyed. It seems that on Thursday night Mr. Serisier, who was at his farm, did not retire to rest till a late hour. The dogs about the place were for some time very restless. After Mr. Serisier had been in bed a short time he was aroused by the cries of some of his servants, who called out " Fire! The stacks are burning." He and those people about the place rushed into the farm yard, and found the two stacks blazing away. Efforts were made to stem the conflagration, but the fire made progress so quickly that, in a very short space of time, the two stacks were reduced to blackened heaps of ashes. The lurid blaze of the fire made the night almost as light as day, and everything around was perfectly distinguishable. It was a fortunate circumstance there was little, if any, wind blowing; for if there had been, it is impossible to guess what damage might have been done. Mr. Serisier's loss by this untoward and unfortunate event is set down at 250 or 300. The fire is pretty generally believed to be the work of an incendiary; for on the night, just as the Blacks were discovered to be enveloped in flames, a horse could be distinctly heard cantering away from the yard. After the first shock of surprise consequent on the discovery of the fire was over, the attention of Mr. Serisier and those present was directed to the circumstance, and they tracked a man from one stack to the other, and then to the fence where a horse had been tied up. The incendiary had evidently watched his opportunity till the lights were extinguished in the dwelling-house, and then commenced his diabolical work. It seems he fired each end of both stacks, and then rushed to his horse and galloped off. The services of the police were called into requisition in the morning, and they followed the tracks until they were lost and obliterated by a mob of bush horses which had galloped over the ground.

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